How pollination helps plants and humans ?


We know about pollination, types of pollination, the pollinators, how it leads to fertilization and the difference between pollination and fertilization, but do you have any idea how it helps plants ? That's what we are going to talk about in this post.

Pollination helps the plants to reproduce so that they can keep producing new species with vibrant colours, sweet nectar, etc.. Pollination helps to get variations in beautiful colours and the fruits we eat which can also be grown manually later.


How does pollination help the plants ?

Pollination helps the plants to reproduce so that they can keep producing new species with vibrant colours, sweet nectar, etc. but that's it. More than the plant, pollination helps us humans in almost our day to day life.

Pollinators are as important as pollination, but without pollinators, pollination is not possible (not all plants require pollination but majority do). The agents who transfer the pollen from one flower to another are called pollinators. Example of pollinators is as follows:-
  • Wind
  • Water
  • Birds
  • Bees 
  • Bats
  • Flies
  • Small mammals (Rodent, Ferret, sugar glider, etc.)
 Pollination
Pollination

How does pollination help humans ? 

Pollination and pollinators both are important for us humans as they both go hand in hand. Now you must be thinking that how are pollinators important for us humans ?

So, now we know that pollination takes place with that help of a pollinators but if these pollinators go extinct how will pollination take place which gives us seeds which then grows into a fruit ? So pollinators are required as much as pollination.

Pollination helps to get variations in beautiful colours and the fruits we eat which can also be grown manually later. If pollinators won't do their job of transferring pollen grains from one flower to another then there would be no fruits, no variations in the flowers and most importantly we won't get to experiment on some of the amazing species out there which might go extinct sooner or later. 

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